Economics and Finance is where business, applied mathematics, and human behavior meet.

Studying it requires not only an analytical mind, but also curiosity about contemporary events and society as a whole.

 
 

AACSB Accredited logoThe Barney Barnett School of Business and Free Enterprise at Florida Southern College has taken its place among the most respected university business schools in the world by earning accreditation from AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

Top Reasons to Choose Economics and Finance at Florida Southern College

  • Accreditation by AACSB is a mark of excellence in business education, earned by less than 5 percent of the world’s business programs.
  • Take courses that stress both theory and application.
  • Our graduates earn Ph.D.'s at Yale, Rutgers, and the London School of Economics.
  • Florida Southern College alumni work for the World Bank, the European Union, and in corporate law.
  • An economics degree shows employers you’re creative, logical, and disciplined.
  • Economics majors earn one of the highest starting salaries in the U.S.

As an Economics and Finance major at Florida Southern College, you’ll develop the analytical and strategic thinking skills necessary to predict market trends, analyze market structures, and assess the likely effects of government economic policies. More importantly, you’ll be prepared to help tackle some of the world’s most challenging issues.

Engaged Learning in the Classroom

Economics courses at Florida Southern College require significant participation—all designed to enhance your public speaking ability and your ability to lead group discussions. You’ll also write papers analyzing current economic issues that draw on up-to-the-minute resources such as the Wall Street Journal and master material by defending your research findings and recommendations as the rest of the class poses questions.

And as a senior, you’ll complete a thesis requiring advanced research on a topic you choose. Past topics range from salaries in baseball to Florida’s grapefruit industry to the economics of criminal behavior.

Graduate & Professional Opportunities

Our graduates frequently enter careers in banking and finance, government, and teaching. Many work as foreign exchange traders and stockbrokers, financial consultants, and investment advisers.

Florida Southern College students have been admitted to prestigious graduate programs at Yale, London School of Economics, Florida State University, American University, Vanderbilt University, University of Stockholm, and Stetson Law School.

Special Features

Gain professional experience and build your network through internship opportunities at sites such as Credit Suisse and Goldman Sachs.

You’ll work with faculty who are dedicated teachers and active scholars publishing their research in leading journals. But they also bring to the classroom experience they’ve gained serving as economic consultants and working in the brokerage industry.

 

Program Requirements

Economics and Finance Major Requirements

The Economics and Finance major is designed to provide an interdisciplinary education with the purpose of addressing the theoretical underpinnings of economic decisions as well as the practical applications to finance. This program will help students develop both quantitative and qualitative reasoning skills while helping them learn how to apply those to the field of finance.

The program will help prepare students to compete in the job market along a variety of career paths, from financial services and analysis to government service, as well as graduate programs in economics, finance and business.

A. General Education Requirements 40 hours
B. Major Requirements 56 hours
ECO 2205 Principles of Microeconomics
ECO 2207 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECO 3305 Microeconomic Theory
ECO 3307 Macroeconomic Theory
ECO/BUS 3320 Applied Statistics of Business and Economics
ACC 2111 Financial Accounting
ACC 2112 Managerial Accounting
BUS 3453 Managerial Finance
BUS 4188 Investments
MAT 2050 Applied Calculus or
MAT 2311 Calculus 1

Sixteen hours in electives selected from the following, with at least 4 coming from each category:

Category 1: Finance Electives
BUS 3670 Financial Risk Management
BUS 3888 Principles of Real Estate Analysis and Valuation
BUS 4205 Spreadsheet Modeling and Quantitative Business Decisions
BUS 4255 International Financial Management
BUS 4430 Business Ethics, Communication, and Risk Management
BUS 4960/61 Business Administration Internship
Category 2: Economics Electives
ECO 3308 Monetary Economics
ECO 3319 Labor Economics
ECO 3345 Economics and the Environment
ECO 4406 Public Economics
ECO 4407 International Trade and Finance
ECO 4415 Industrial Organization
ECO 4999 Contemporary Issues in Economics
ECO 4100 Law and Economics
ECO 4200 Humanomics
ECO 4550 Comparative Economic Institutions
C. Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 12 hours
D. Electives 16 hours
E. Total 124 hours

Planning on Graduate School?

Students anticipating graduate study are advised to enroll in additional quantitative courses and other appropriate electives. Your adviser can help you select the right courses.

Minor in Economics

To earn a minor in economics you will need to complete 20 hours of ECO courses successfully.

 

Course Descriptions

Accounting

ACC 2111 FOUNDATIONS OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Four hours. To understand accounting for corporations. Gen Ed: Qn

ACC 2112 FOUNDATIONS OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
Four hours. Prerequisite: ACC 2111. Managerial accounting and analysis. Gen Ed: Qn

Business Administration

BUS 3453 MANAGERIAL FINANCE
Four hours. Prerequisites: ACC 2112 and ECO 2205 and ECO 2207. Planning and controlling sources and uses of a firm’s funds. Includes capital budgeting, dividend policies, determination of optimal capital structure, and internal vs. external financing of expansion.

BUS 3670 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT
Four hours. Prerequisites: ACC 2112 and ECO 2205 and ECO 2207. The course presents the fundamentals of financial risk management. It provides a realistic and conceptually motivated overview of risk management for global corporations. Techniques to identify, measure and manage financial risk including use of futures, options, swaps, real options, financial engineering, value-at-risk and other risk measures are studied and applied.

BUS 3888 PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS AND VALUATION
Four hours. Prerequisites: ACC 2112 and ECO 2205 and ECO 2207. This course will provide a survey of real estate assets, markets, and decisions. The emphasis will be on the development of analytical techniques and information required for implementation; the course will also cover institutional features of real estate markets and transactions.

BUS 4188 INVESTMENTS
Four hours. Prerequisites: BUS 3453. Emphasis from standpoint of individual investor in corporate and government securities; investment objectives; appraisal of investment risks; valuation of securities; portfolio management.

BUS 4205 SPREADSHEET MODELING AND QUANTITATIVE BUSINESS DECISIONS
Four hours. Prerequisites: BUS/ECO 3320 and BUS 3453. The course provides a complete and modern treatment of management science methodology and the use of spreadsheet applications. Topics include decision theory, linear programming, network analysis, transpiration & assignment, PERT/CPM, forecasting, inventory control and queuing theory.

BUS 4255 INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Four hours. Prerequisites: BUS 3125 and ACC 2112. Examination of the international financial environment of business. Emphasis is on the financial decision making process relating to foreign exchange risk management, hedging, arbitrage, currency futures and option markets, management of foreign investments, country risk analysis, international sources of financing and international money and capital markets.

BUS 4430 BUSINESS ETHICS, COMMUNICATION, AND RISK MANAGEMENT
Four hours. Prerequisites: Junior standing, and BUS 2217 and 3311 or permission of the instructor. This course integrates legal research, writing, and document creation with business ethics. It is designed to prepare business students to effectively address and avert the legal and ethical challenges they will face in day-to-day business operations. Gen Ed: MV

BUS 4960/4961 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION INTERNSHIP
Two to four hours. Prerequisites: Senior standing; permission of the instructor; minimum 2.5 GPA. Correlating theory and practice in an operational setting, supervision by cooperating practitioners and faculty in approved areas of application.

Economics

ECO 2205 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
Four hours. Consumer behavior and aggregation to markets, producer behavior, theory of the firm, and aggregation to markets analysis: production and pricing of goods, factors of production and their attendant input markets and distribution of output, elasticities and incidence of a tax. Gen Ed: Qn

ECO 2207 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
Four hours. National income and product accounts; theory of aggregate supply and demand, employment, consumption, investment, price level, economic growth, money, currency exchange, the Federal Reserve, interest rates, and comparative economic systems. Gen Ed: Qn

ECO 3305 MICROECONOMIC THEORY
Four hours. Prerequisites: ECO 2205. Decision making in a market-oriented economy. Consumer theory, production theory, and pricing and output under differing market structures.

ECO 3307 MACROECONOMIC THEORY
Four hours. Prerequisite: ECO 2207. National income and product accounts; IS-LM models; theory of aggregate supply and demand, employment, consumption, investment, price level, and economic growth.

ECO 3308 MONETARY ECONOMICS
Four hours. Prerequisites: ECO 2205 and ECO 2207. An analysis of the monetary and banking systems and the impact of the financial sector upon real economic variables. Topics include the Federal Reserve System, monetary policy and implementation, and the relation of domestic and international financial markets and monetary problems.

ECO 3319 LABOR ECONOMICS
Four hours. Prerequisites: ECO 2205 and ECO 2207 or equivalents. Economic theory and analysis dealing with the allocation of labor as an input to the production process. Wage rate determination, micro and macro unemployment, and income differentials are integrated topics throughout the course. The theory of human capital and valuation is covered in depth.

ECO 3320 APPLIED STATISTICS OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
Four hours.Same as BUS 3320. Prerequisites: MAT 2022 or its equivalent or permission of the instructor. Mathematical statistical tools for managerial analysis, research, and decision making. Data collection and presentation, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, time series analysis and forecasting. Gen Ed: Qn

ECO 3345 ECONOMICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT
Four hours. Prerequisite: ECO 2205. Topics include valuing environments, property rights, externalities, population problems, renewable and non-renewable resource, and pollution. Gen Ed: Qn

ECO 4100 LAW AND ECONOMICS
Four hours. Prerequisite: ECO 2205. This course provides a general survey of law and economics. Law and Economics has evolved from a small research field in economics and law and has become a robust school of thought that has permeated the study of law and legal theory during the last several decades. This course will explore the effect of legal rules and legal institutions using the general tools of economics. This course will apply economic concepts to the law of property, contracts, torts, criminal law, and constitutional law. It will discuss the economic efficiency of the common law and examine the evolution and development of the law, legal institutions, and social norms. The course will discuss the economic impact of the law and legal institutions on society.

ECO 4200 HUMANOMICS: EXCHANGE AND THE HUMAN CONDITION
Four hours. Prerequisite: ECO 2205 or Permission of Instructor. What makes a rich nation rich? What makes a good person good? And what do these questions have to do with one another? While exploring these and other questions about markets and ethics, students will challenge the perception of economics as distinct from the humanities. This course combines the laboratory method of inquiry into the human propensity to exchange with the cultural interpretation of the human condition in novels, poems, and film.

ECO 4406 PUBLIC ECONOMICS
Four hours. Prerequisites: ECO 2205 and ECO 2207. An examination of the public sector and its contribution to and interference with economic welfare. The course will include an analysis of expenditures and revenues with regard to their allocation and distribution effects; the concept and significance of private goods and social goods; the role of regulatory agencies; and an examination of fiscal policy as a means of promoting economic stabilization and growth.

ECO 4407 INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE
Four hours. Prerequisites: ECO 2205 and ECO 2207. An analysis of the causes and consequences of international trade and investment. Topics include theories of trade; U.S. trade policy; the balance of payments; exchange rates; and the international monetary system.

ECO 4415 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION
Four hours. Prerequisite: ECO 2205. A study of policy approaches to the problems of monopoly; industrial market structures and how they influence firm conduct and economic performance; welfare implications of oligopoly pricing and non-price competition; government regulation and antitrust policies in theory and practice.

ECO 4550 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS
Four hours. Prerequisite: ECO 2205 and ECO 2207 or by permission of the instructor. This course will focus primarily on comparative political economics. The course will focus on the problems of economic development and the globalization debate; it will be divided into four sections. Section one will cover the basic economic concepts and factual information required for a political economic analysis of policy issues associated with economic development and globalization. Section two will discuss the New Institutional approach to political economy and economic growth. This section will also discuss the problems transitional economies have faced within the last ten years. Section three will discuss the difficulties that have been confronted in over fifty years of attempts to solve the problem of underdevelopment. The final section of the course will discuss the globalization debate; it will discuss the impact on economics, the environment, and cultural consequences of a global marketplace for ideas and products.

ECO 4999 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN ECONOMICS
Four hours. Prerequisite: Final semester senior status or permission of the instructor. Selected topics. Opportunity for original research in economics. Major research paper with formal public presentation.

Mathematics

MAT 2050 APPLIED CALCULUS
Four hours. Prerequisite: Competency in algebra or permission of the instructor. Basic analytic geometry; differentiation and integration of single variable functions; optimization and other applications of single variable calculus, differentiation and integration of multi-variable and trigonometric functions; differential equations, with emphasis on applications to real world problems. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 2311 CALCULUS I WITH PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY
Four hours. The study of differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications of differentiation, Mean Value Theorem, maximum/minimum, problems and The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Topics in plane analytic geometry. Use of computer algebra system (CAS) required. Gen Ed: Qn