Emily Bradshaw, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biology

 “In both lecture and laboratory, I encourage students to take an active role by asking questions and analyzing case studies. In the laboratory, students investigate anatomical structures on a macroscopic and microscopic level through dissection and viewing models, and investigate physiology by collecting and analyzing data such as EKG, urinalysis, and spirometry. Students synthesize structure-function relationships by constructing feedback flow charts. The interconnectedness of body systems is emphasized.”

Dr. Bradshaw received her Ph. D. in Physiology from the University of Kentucky where she studied growth factor induced angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is a complex process whereby new blood vessels grow in response to chemical mediators from pre-existing vasculature. Prokineticin-1 is one such growth factor that is known to promote the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells through activation of PI3K, Akt, eNOS, and Ras signaling pathways. Dr. Bradshaw is interested in the activation of these pathways and their role in pathological conditions such as cancer and ischemic conditions. This is her second year teaching at FSC.

Angiogenesis is a complex process whereby new blood vessels are grown in response to chemical mediators from pre-existing vasculature. Prokineticin-1 is one such chemical mediator that is known to promote the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells through activation of PI3K, Akt, eNOS, and Ras signaling pathways. I am interested in the role of endothelial cells and adipocytes in production of prokineticin-1 and other chemical mediators of angiogenesis. Elucidating the activation of cellular receptors and cellular pathways has implications for cancer cell biology as well as ischemic heart disease.

Education

Ph.D., Physiology, University of Kentucky
B.A., Biology, Hanover College

Honors and Awards

  • Research Assistantship, University of Kentucky - 2004
  • Research Assistantship, University of Kentucky - 2003
  • Dean's List, Hanover College - 2003
  • Mortar Board, National College Senior Honor Society - 2003
  • Beta Beta Beta Biological Society - 2003

Publications or Exhibitions

Bradshaw, E. L., Li, Xiang-An, Guerin, T., Everson, W. V., Wilson, M. E., Bruce-Keller, A. J., Greenberg, R. N., Guo, L., Ross, S. A., Smart, E. J. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent HIV protease inhibitor-induced atherosclerosis by ubiquitination and degradation of protein kinase C. American Journal of Physiology. 291(6), 2006.

Bradshaw, E. L., Smart, E. J. Caveolin-3 binds cholesterol, forms a chaperone protein complex, and inhibits SR-BI-mediated cholesteryl ester uptake in vitro; (in prep).

Bradshaw, E. L., Smart, E. J. Prokineticin-1 induces angiogenesis in a vaceolin-1 and eNOS independent manner; (in prep).

Connect with
Emily Bradshaw

133 Polk Science Building
863.680.4353
ebradshaw@flsouthern.edu