Computer Science / Mathematics

FSC’s Computer Science/Mathematics major provides a foundation in the theory and practice of computer science and mathematics, giving you the experience to be highly desired candidate in both areas.

This interdisciplinary program prepares you to work as a computer scientist or applied mathematician, or enter graduate programs in either computer science or applied mathematics.

Engaged Learning in the Classroom

All of your computer science classes and many of your mathematics courses are taught in modern computer laboratories for hands-on work in every class session.

Coursework includes both collaborative problem solving and individual explorations in a variety of real-world applications including mathematical analysis, software engineering, and group projects.

In your senior seminar, you’ll work with a faculty member on a self-directed research project or an applied project on a computer science or applied mathematics topic.

Course Information

Your courses provide solid grounding in the fundamentals and practical applications of both computer science and mathematics. You’ll take computer science classes in which you’ll design and develop software in a variety of computing environments; learn programming and data structures using C, C++, and Java, and other languages; a computing systems course, and gain practical experience in software engineering. Your mathematics courses include discrete structures, calculus, linear algebra, and a course in proof techniques.

See a sampling of Computer Science & Mathematics courses below  

Related Majors

Departmental Clubs & Organizations

Many of our students belong to Kappa Mu Epsilon, the mathematics honor society, and the Mathematics Association of America, a math club.

Internship Opportunities

Our computer science/mathematics students have recently interned with the City of Lakeland’s IT department and TTI Telecom.

Career Opportunities

Graduating from FSC, you’ll be ready to become a computer software engineer (ranked number one by CNNMoney), programmer, computer system analysts, applied mathematician, or computer specialist in a wide variety of fields.

Our recent graduates have found jobs in a variety of areas, including software developer, software engineer, web developer, and IT system support analyst.

You’ll find FSC graduates working at:

  • Lockheed Martin Corporation
  • AAA Corporate
  • Strategic Systems & Technology Corporation
  • Palm Coast Data
  • Harris Corporation

Our graduates also frequently go on to graduate school in computer science and business programs.

Start the Conversation
and Contact…

Dr. Kenneth Henderson
863.680.4328
khenderson@flsouthern.edu

Special Features

FSC faculty are active researchers in computer science and mathematics, but they also have practical experience in a variety of computing disciplines, including extensive industry experience in all aspects of software engineering and software project management.

The Hartje Lecture Series brings leading mathematicians and computer scientists to FSC to present their research.

Your professors at FSC pursue a range of interests, from knot theory and mathematical logic to visual basic programming and computer game design.


 

Program Requirements

Computer Science/Mathematics Major Requirements

A. General Education Requirements 40 hours
B. Major Requirements 48-50 hours
CSC 2231 Programming and Data Structures I
CSC 2232 Programming and Data Structures II
CSC 3233 Programming and Data Structures III
CSC 3310 Computer Organization and Architecture
or  
CSC 4410 Operating Systems and Concurrency
CSC 4400 Software Engineering
CSC/MAT 2100 Discrete Structures
MAT 2311 Calculus I with Plane Analytic Geometry
MAT 2312 Calculus II with Plane Analytic Geometry
MAT 2505 Linear Algebra
MAT 3313 Calculus III with Solid Analytic Geometry
MAT 3205 Proof Techniques
CSC 4999 Computer Science Senior Seminar
or  
MAT 4999 Mathematics Senior Seminar

One course from the following if not taken above):

CSC 3310 Computer Organization and Architecture
CSC 3335 Database Analysis and Design
CSC 3336 Web Applications
CSC 3350 Computer Game Design
CSC 3370 Programming Language Concepts
CSC 4410 Operating Systems and Concurrency
CSC 4640 Selected Topics in Computer Science
CSC/MAT 4645 Selected Topics in Computer Science and Mathematics
C. Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements 20 hours
or  
D. Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 12 hours
E. Electives 14-24 hours
E. Total 124 hours
 

Course Descriptions

Computer Science

CSC 1010 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING (for non-majors)
Two hours. Introduction to design and development of computer programs using Visual BASIC. Topics include design of visual human-computer interfaces, calculations, decision making, and loops. Does not count towards the Computer Science major or minor or the Computer Science/Mathematics major.

CSC 1020 BITS BOTS AND GAMES (for non-majors)
Two hours. An introduction to current computer science topics such as human-computer interaction, robotics, computer games, and societal issues. Does not count towards the Computer Science major or minor or the Computer Science/Mathematics major.

CSC 2100 DISCRETE STRUCTURES
Four hours. Same as MAT 2100. An introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics include logic, set theory, basic proofs, mathematical induction and recursion, counting principles and probability.

CSC 2231 PROGRAMMING AND DATA STRUCTURES I
Four hours. Concepts, terminology, and methods of object-oriented programming, algorithms and problem-solving, fundamental data structures. Java Programming.

CSC 2232 PROGRAMMING AND DATA STRUCTURES II
Four hours. Prerequisite: CSC 2231. Event-driven programming, fundamental algorithms, algorithmic analysis and complexity, C++ programming with pointers and memory management.

CSC 3310 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE
Four hours. Prerequisite: CSC 1010 or CSC 2231 or sophomore standing. Introduces students to digital systems, logic circuits, and the organization and architecture of computer systems, beginning with the standard von Neumann model and then moving forward to more recent architectural concepts.

CSC 3335 DATABASE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
Two hours. Prerequisite: CSC 1010 or CSC 2231 or sophomore standing. Introduction to the theory and practice of database systems. Focus on analysis and design of relational databases, including distributed systems and large business and scientific databases.

CSC 3336 WEB APPLICATIONS
Two hours. Prerequisite: CSC 3335. Introduction to the theory and practice of web applications including how to design and develop web sites and web based applications. Topics will include web development tools, languages, and models.

CSC 3350 COMPUTER GAME DESIGN
Four hours. Prerequisites: CSC 2231 and CSC 2232. Storyboarding, technology, science, and graphics involved in the creation of computer games. Emphasis on hands-on design and development of games.

CSC 3370 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE CONCEPTS
Four hours. Prerequisites: CSC 2231 and CSC 2232 and CSC/MAT 2100. Study of the fundamental concepts of modern programming languages. Comparison of programming language design, implementation, and use in different programming language paradigms. Design and implementation of simple programming languages.

CSC 3951 COMPUTER SCIENCE RESEARCH I
Two or three hours. Prerequisites: CSC 2231 and CSC 2232 and permission of the instructor and minimum 3.0 grade point average. Directed research in a computer science topic to be selected in consultation with the faculty. Semester-long project culminating in a formal presentation and detailed technical documentation of the research process and results.

CSC 4400 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
Four hours. Prerequisites: CSC 2232 and successful completion of coursework that satisfies Effective Communication SLOs A and B. Concepts and methods of large-scale software development. Requirements analysis, specification, design, implementation, testing, and documentation. Professional and ethical responsibilities. Risks and liabilities of computer-based systems. Individual responsibility, teamwork, professionalism, and effective written and oral technical communication are emphasized in a semester-long project. Gen Ed: EC-C

CSC 4410 OPERATING SYSTEMS AND CONCURRENCY
Four hours. Prerequisite: CSC 2232. Components of an operating system, processes, scheduling, memory management, and file systems. Concurrent programming and synchronization.

CSC 4640 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Four hours. Prerequisite: CSC 2232 or permission of the instructor. Covers contemporary topics in computer science. (For example: Artificial intelligence, robotics.) Course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

CSC 4645 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Two or four hours. Same as MAT 4645. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Covers contemporary topics at an advanced level in applied mathematics and computer science. (For example: numerical methods, graph theory.) Course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

CSC 4952 COMPUTER SCIENCE RESEARCH II
Two or three hours. Prerequisites: Senior standing and CSC 3951 and permission of the instructor, and minimum 3.0 grade point average. Directed research in a computer science topic to be selected in consultation with the instructor. Semester-long project culminating in a formal presentation and detailed technical documentation of the research process and results.

CSC 4960 INTERNSHIP 
Three hours. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor and minimum 2.5 grade point average. Correlating theory and practice in an operating setting; supervision by cooperating practitioners and faculty in several areas of application. Does not count towards the Computer Science/Mathematics major.

CSC 4999 COMPUTER SCIENCE SENIOR SEMINAR
Two hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Presentation and delivery of papers from the current computer science literature. In-depth study of a computer science topic culminating in a formal presentation and paper.

Mathematics

MAT 1007 SOCIAL WORLD ALGORITHMS
Four hours. A study of various areas of modern mathematics with applications to the social world. Topics include voting, graph theory, fractal geometry, population growth models, and statistical sample bias.
Gen Ed: SW (Aw, An), Qn

MAT 1047 PRECALCULUS 
Four hours. A study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and coordinate geometric techniques. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 2022 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
Four hours. Students use statistical methods to analyze data from real world situations and make inferences. These methods involve descriptive analysis, probability distributions, correlation, linear regression, the Central Limit Theorem, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 2032 BIOSTATISTICS
Four hours. Applied statistical tools for analysis and decision making with applications for biology, environmental and agricultural sciences. Statistical terminology, collection and presentation of data, probability distributions, sampling, experimental design, parametric and nonparametric procedures, regression, correlation and analysis of variance. Class demonstrations of analysis using statistical software. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 2050 APPLIED CALCULUS
Four hours. Prerequisite: Competency in algebra or permission of the instructor. Basic analytic geometry; differentiation and integration of single variable functions; optimization and other applications of single variable calculus, differentiation and integration of multi-variable and trigonometric functions; differential equations, with emphasis on applications to real world problems. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 2100 DISCRETE STRUCTURES
Four hours. Same as CSC 2100. An introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics include logic, set theory, basic proofs, mathematical induction and recursion, counting principles and probability.

MAT 2311 CALCULUS I WITH PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY
Four hours. The study of differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications of differentiation, Mean Value Theorem, maximum/minimum, problems and The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Topics in plane analytic geometry. Use of computer algebra system (CAS) required. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 2312 CALCULUS II WITH PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY
Four hours. Prerequisite: MAT 2311. Continuation of MAT 2311. Techniques and applications of integration, Simpson’s and Trapezoidal Rules, improper integrals, infinite series, and Taylor expansions of functions. Use of a computer algebra system required. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 2505 LINEAR ALGEBRA
Four hours. Prerequisites: MAT 2312. The study of matrices, solution of homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems of equations, vector spaces, linear mappings, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.

MAT 3205 PROOF TECHNIQUES
Four hours. Prerequisite: MAT 2312. An introduction to the logic and methods of higher mathematics, emphasizing critical thinking and basic proof techniques.

MAT 3313 CALCULUS III WITH SOLID ANALYTIC GEOMETRY
Four hours. Prerequisite: MAT 2312. Solid analytic geometry, vector calculus. partial differentiation, and multiple integrals. Use of computer algebra system (CAS) required. Gen Ed: Qn

MAT 3350 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
Four hours. Prerequisite: MAT 2312. Students use qualitative, numerical, and analytical techniques to study solutions of ordinary differential equations and systems of ordinary differential equations. Topics include analytic methods for solving separable and linear differential equations, numeric methods, existence and uniqueness theorems, systems of linear differential equations, stability of autonomous systems, discrete dynamical systems, and chaos. Use of a computer algebra system is required.

MAT 3442 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
Four hours. Prerequisites: MAT 3313 and 3205. Study of probability models, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling estimation, multivariate random variables, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals.

MAT 4205 ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES
Four hours. Prerequisite: MAT 3205. This course explores the basic properties of the fundamental structures found so very useful to algebraists, notably, rings, fields, and groups. It also entails a significant collaborative research and problem-solving capstone experience.

MAT 4315 ELEMENTARY ANALYSIS
Four hours. Prerequisites: MAT 3313 and 3205. The beginning study of analysis including countability, sequences, convergence, limits, continuity, and differentiation.

MAT 4630 SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS
Two or four hours. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Covers contemporary topics at an advanced level in mathematics (such as graph theory, group theory, knot theory, linear algebra, logic, modern algebra, real analysis, topology). Course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

MAT 4645 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Two or four hours. Same as CSC 4645. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Covers contemporary topics at an advanced level in applied mathematics and computer science. (For example: numerical methods, graph theory.) Course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

MAT 4999 MATHEMATICS SENIOR SEMINAR
Two hours. This research course entails a student initiated and faculty directed development of a paper, topic, or solution of a problem in mathematics at a level substantially above or beyond that of the coursework in the major. In particular, the student will select a faculty director who will supervise the student in research of an approved topic or solution of an approved problem.