Solve problems. Create new products. Appreciate the mysteries of life.

FSC’s Chemistry program gives you the opportunity to put theories to the test. As an award-winning, national leader in engaged learning, your faculty will inspire, encourage, and collaborate with you through your own personalized research.

Our comprehensive curriculum encompasses five key areas of chemistry – organic, inorganic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry – as well as mathematics and physics.

In addition to the traditional fields of chemistry, you’ll gain experience in emerging interdisciplinary fields such as forensic chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and nanotechnology.

Top Reasons to choose FSC for Chemistry

  • Engage in high-impact, original research with faculty mentors and chemical research specialists.
  • Take courses in special topics ranging from medicinal chemistry to forensic chemistry, which allows you to further understand and customize your academic experience.
  • Get hands-on learning by using our state-of-the-art instrumentation under the guidance of our nationally recognized faculty.
  • Participate in internship program with industry leading experts.
  • Present your collaborative research at regional and national conferences alongside your faculty mentors.
  • Attend interactive lectures on current research by industry leading experts in chemistry.

Engaged Learning in the Classroom

“My professors really took the material beyond the book, especially when I began to do research. The opportunities for hands-on experience at FSC put me ahead of the competition.” --Courtney Baker

In every chemistry course at FSC, you’ll engage in laboratory and experimental research. In your labs and lecture courses, you’ll participate in guided inquiry experiments, collaborative learning, problem solving, team-based laboratory projects, experimental design, and peer teaching.

Internship Sites

FSC's chemistry majors have participated in internships at local companies such as:

  • Lakeland Chemical Specialties, Inc
  • Florida Chemical Company, Inc
  • University of Florida’s Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred
  • Publix Supermarket’s Quality Control Laboratory

Departmental Clubs & Organizations

Our department sponsors a chapter of Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society, which has received national recognition for their activities and outreach to the local community. We also host a chapter of Gamma Sigma Epsilon, the national honor society for chemistry.

Scholarships & Financial Aid

Chemistry majors at FSC are eligible for consideration for the John and Ernestine Surber Scholarship, as well as the John L. and Viola J. Spencer Chemistry Scholarships, which are awarded annually to outstanding chemistry majors in their junior or senior years.

“We are committed to providing you with the finest quality education culminating in both an awareness of your discipline and also an expertise that will help you choose a rewarding career regardless of which direction you decide to pursue.”--Carmen V. Gauthier, Ph. D.

Career Opportunities

By graduating with a degree in chemistry from FSC, you’ll be well prepared for graduate or professional school, working in an industry research or government research laboratory, teaching high school science, or as a leading scientist within multinational organizations.

You’ll find Florida Southern graduates thriving in a variety of fields:

  • Academia
  • Architecture and engineering
    consulting firms
  • Chemical manufacturing companies
  • Educational institutions K-12
  • Environmental firms
  • Food production companies
  • Forensic Crime Labs
  • Manufacturing and processing firms
  • Medical and research laboratories
  • Pharmaceutical companies

FSC chemistry majors have also been accepted to medical, dentistry, and graduate schools, at institutions such as:

  • Auburn University
  • Duke University
  • Georgia Tech University
  • University of Connecticut
  • University of Florida
  • University of Georgia
  • University of Miami
  • University of South Florida
  • Vanderbilt University
  • Notre Dame University

Start the Conversation
and Contact…

Carmen Gauthier

Carmen Valdez Gauthier
Professor of Chemistry
863.680.4589
cgauthier@flsouthern.edu

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Explore Science at Florida Southern

Education and experiences that prepare students for the real world.

Special Features

Collaborate with faculty on research throughout the academic year and during intensive summer research programs.

Our faculty work in a wide range of specializations, allowing you to explore all aspects of chemistry. Their research includes green chemistry; developing therapeutic agents for malaria, cancer, and other diseases; computational nanophotonics; and quantum molecular dynamics.

Our students have conducted research at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Stanford’s Summer Research Program in the Biomedical Sciences and presented their work at local, regional, and national conferences and in professional journals.

FSC chemistry majors study abroad in places such as England, Peru, and Costa Rica.


 

Program Requirements

Chemistry (B.A.) Major Requirements

A. General Education Requirements 40 hours
B. Major Requirements 54 hours
CHE 1111 Principles of Chemistry I
CHE 1112 Principles of Chemistry II
CHE 2221 Organic Chemistry I
CHE 2222 Organic Chemistry II
CHE 2335 Analytical Chemistry
CHE 2355 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry
CHE 3335 Instrumental Analysis
CHE 4410 Introduction to Research Methods
or  
CHE 4960 Internship in Chemistry
CHE 4999 Senior Research
MAT 2311 Calculus I with Plane Analytic Geometry
MAT 2312 Calculus II with Plane Analytic Geometry
PHY 2110 General Physics I (Calculus Based)
PHY 2120 General Physics II (Calculus Based)

Eight hours chosen from the following:

CHE 2275 Forensic Chemistry
CHE 3320 Applied Physical, Analytical, and Inorganic Chemistry
CHE 3341 Physical Chemistry I
CHE 3342 Physical Chemistry II
CHE/BIO 3361 Biochemistry: Structure and Function
CHE/BIO 3362 Biochemistry: Molecular Biology
CHE 4425 Special Topics in Chemistry
CHE 4455 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
C. Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements 20 hours
D. Electives 10 hours
E. Total 124 hours

For a complete listing of requirements, please refer to the
Academic Catalog  

Minor in Chemistry

To earn a minor in chemistry you will must complete 24 hours of courses in chemistry.

Chemistry (B.S.) Major Requirements

A. General Education Requirements 40 hours
B. Major Requirements 66 hours
CHE 1111 Principles of Chemistry I
CHE 1112 Principles of Chemistry II
CHE 2221 Organic Chemistry I
CHE 2222 Organic Chemistry II
CHE 2335 Analytical Chemistry
CHE 2355 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry
CHE 3320 Applied Physical, Analytical, and Inorganic Chemistry
CHE 3335 Instrumental Analysis
CHE 3341 Physical Chemistry I
CHE 3342 Physical Chemistry II
BIO/CHE 3361 Biochemistry: Structure and Function
CHE 4455 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
CHE 4410 Introduction to Research Methods
or  
CHE 4960 Internship in Chemistry
CHE 4999 Senior Research
MAT 2311 Calculus I with Plane Analytic Geometry
MAT2312 Calculus II with Plane Analytic Geometry
PHY 2110 General Physics I (Calculus Based)
PHY 2120 General Physics II (Calculus Based)

Four hours chosen from the following:

CHE 2275 Forensic Chemistry
CHE/BIO 3362 Biochemistry: Molecular Biology
CHE 4425 Special Topics in Chemistry
C. Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 12 hours
D. Electives 6 hours
E. Total 124 hours

 

Course Descriptions

CHE 1000 PREPARATION FOR PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
Two hours. A review and practice in those basic principles and mathematical skills needed by students planning to take CHE 1111 and CHE 1112. Coursework includes active learning exercises and collaborative problem solving.

CHE 1011 CHEMICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES I
Four hours. A review and study of chemical concepts that includes atomic structure, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, acidity and basicity and oxidation-reduction reactions. The laboratory portion will contain experiments that reinforce the principles introduced in the classroom. Gen Ed: NW

CHE 1012 CHEMICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES II
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE1011. A study of organic compounds that includes structure, properties, and reactions of functional groups followed by an examination of the role these molecules play in biological structures and processes. Concepts presented correlate to other sciences such as ecology, agriculture, biochemistry and medicine. Gen Ed: NW

CHE 1111 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I
Four hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1000 or one year of high school chemistry. Quantitative treatment of the principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, states of matter, energy, atomic structure, periodicity, ionic compounds, and molecular structure. Gen Ed: NW

CHE 1112 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 1111. The topics covered in this course will include: intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, acid, bases, buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and introduction to basic organic chemistry. Gen Ed: NW

CHE 2015 PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY
Four hours. A survey and study of chemical concepts that includes atomic structure, chemical reactivity, chemical bonding, and acid/base chemistry. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of organic compounds that includes structure, properties, and reactions of functional groups followed by an examination of the role these molecules play in biological structures and processes.  For RN to BSN students only.

CHE 2221 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 1012 or CHE 1112. Detailed study of carbon compounds approached through the study of structure, functional groups, reactions, and mechanisms. In the laboratory, emphasis is placed upon illustrating chemical reactivity through experimentation and molecular characterization utilizing state-of-the-art instrumentation.

CHE 2222 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2221. Continuation of the study of carbon compounds approached through the study of structure, functional groups, reactions, and mechanisms. In the laboratory, emphasis is placed upon synthesis illustrating chemical reactivity and molecular characterization utilizing state-of-the-art instrumentation.

CHE 2335 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 1112. Principles of analytical chemistry will be covered with an emphasis on quantitative measurements and statistical data analysis. Topics may include gravimetric analysis, volumetric, and potentiometric methods of analysis with a focus on acid-base, reduction-oxidation, and complexometric chemistry.

CHE 2355 DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 1112. Fundamental topics in inorganic chemistry will be explored, among them: atomic theory and periodicity, the structure of simple solids, main group elements, and structure and bonding of coordination compounds. The laboratory component of the course will give students experience with various laboratory techniques used in the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds.

CHE 2275 FORENSIC CHEMISTRY
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 1012 or CHE 1112. This course will focus on the applications of chemistry to forensic science. Through the use of case studies such as the Kennedy assassination, Napoleon’s death, the shroud of Turin, etc., the topics of trace evidence (soils, glass, and heavy metals poisons); toxicology and pharmacology (analysis of alcohol, poisons and drugs) will be explored. Students will gain experience with analytical and instrumental methods used in investigating crimes, with an emphasis on the measurement accuracy and traceability required in criminalistics.

CHE 3320 APPLIED PHYSICAL, ANALYTICAL, AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Four hours. Pre-requisite: CHE 3341. The objective of this course is to integrate the theory and application of methods in physical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and inorganic chemistry, with an emphasis on inorganic synthesis and the characterization of the inorganic products using spectroscopy, thermodynamics and kinetics.

CHE 3335 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS
Two hours. Pre-requisite: CHE 2235. The objective of this course is to apply the principles of quantitative chemical analysis to instrumental techniques. Electrochemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic techniques will be covered in theory and in practice through a combination of lecture and hands-on experimentation. However, as there is no laboratory component to this course, lectures will, when appropriate, integrate use of instrumentation as engagement within the classroom.

CHE 3341 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
Four hours. Prerequisites: CHE 2222 and PHY 2120 and MAT 2312 and successful completion of coursework that satisfies Effective Communication SLOs A and B. The topics covered in this class include foundations of quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure and the chemical bond, atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Gen Ed: EC-C

CHE 3342 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II
Two hours. Pre-requisite: CHE 3341. The topics covered in this class include properties of gases, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, solutions, kinetics and reaction dynamics.

CHE 3361 BIOCHEMISTRY: Structure and Function
Four hours. Same as BIO 3361. Prerequisite: CHE 2222. Biochemistry is the study of the molecules and chemical reactions of living systems. Topics covered in Biochemistry I include water, structure and function of biomolecules, enzymes, bioenergetics, major metabolic pathways, and metabolic regulation.

CHE 3362 BIOCHEMISTRY: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
Four hours. Same as BIO 3362. Prerequisite: BIO 3361 or CHE 3361. Students will consider important topics in molecular genetics, including structure, function and manipulation of DNA, and selected topics in metabolism and signaling.

CHE 4410 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
Two hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing. This course will encompass the exploration of a scientific research topic under the supervision of a professor having expertise in that area. It will consist of library and laboratory investigations that will culminate in the dissemination of the research methods and findings at scientific and scholarly meetings and a written research report.

CHE 4425 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY
Four hours. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course allows for an upper level examination of current or advanced topics in chemistry.

CHE 4455 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Two hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2221 and CHE 3341. This course will cover coordination chemistry and reaction mechanisms, group theory and symmetry as applied to the understanding of bonding and spectroscopy of inorganic compounds, fundamentals of organometallic reactions, catalysis, and special topics in bioinorganic and material science.

CHE 4960 INTERNSHIP IN CHEMISTRY
Two hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor advisor. A full- or part-time work-study appointment in a clinical, commercial, governmental, or industrial laboratory supervised jointly by an on-site supervisor and Department of Chemistry faculty member.

CHE 4999 SENIOR RESEARCH
Two hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing. A capstone course that will engage the student in the exploration of a scientific research topic under the supervision of a professor having expertise in the areas of interest. It will consist of library and laboratory investigations that will culminate in a written research report and the dissemination of the research methods and findings at a scientific or scholarly meeting.